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The Citizens Republican Club of Philadelphia

“Men grow rich not by labor, but by credit and capital which they command,” stated a flyer by the Brown and Stevens Bank in 1919. The Citizens Republican Club, comprised of the elite African-American community in Philadelphia, was founded based on capital. The more capital a man possessed, whether in social, political, or economic capital, the more influence he had on society. The Citizens Republican Club functioned as a power base for men looking to increase their capital in African-American Philadelphia in the early half of the twentieth century. Not only did the club endorse their own candidates for office, but other African-American clubs sought their support for candidates as well. The members of the Citizens Republican Club maintained so much capital that the club wielded more social and political influence on Black Philadelphia than any other organized group.

Soap Box Minstrels of the Citizens Republican Club of Philadelphia circa 1915


 

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HISTORY OF THE CITIZENS REPUBLICAN CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA

Founded in 1884, the Citizens Republican Club of Philadelphia was the first club of its kind in the country that catered exclusively to African-Americans. The Citizens Republican Club of Philadelphia, made up of men of prominence and capital, possessed a great deal of influence on the Black community in the city in the early twentieth century. Visit this page to learn more about the history and founding of the Citizens Republican Club of Philadelphia.

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FINANCIAL CAPITAL

Wright, Sr. and R. R. Wright, Jr. worked to promote smart banking, investments, and loan acquisitions among both the Old and New African-American populations of Philadelphia.  Learn more about the Wrights and others involved in African-American business in Philadelphia. 

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POLITICAL CAPITAL

The Citizens Republican Club counted among its members some of Philadelphia's African-American political elite, including Amos Scott, the first African-American magistrate in the city. African-American politicians were very active both in and outside of their wards during the 1910s and 1920s. See how the Citizens Republican Club functioned as a political network, hearing the stories of prominent African-American politicians who left their mark in Philadelphia and ont he national scene.

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SOCIAL CAPITAL

The Citizens Republican Club was first and foremost about ssocializing. Due to the pedigree and prestige obtained by club members, the Citizens Republican Club had a great impact on African-American social life in Philadelphia, inlcuding sports, theater, and other forms of entertainment.  Explore the influence of the Citizens Republican Club members on Philadelphia's social life.